Be Suspicious with App Permissions

A few weeks ago I went camping in the woods with my husband, we were surrounded by the peace and beauty of old trees and amazing landscapes. However, as any person who has camped knows, the nights, though starry and calming, can also be intimidating in the silence and darkness of the wildness.

In that opportunity, we brought everything we needed for our experience in nature: tent, sleeping bag and even food containers to prevent bears from getting into our supply. However, we failed to bring a flashlight, so we pulled out our mobile devices and downloaded one from the app store.

Being in nature, away from rush hour and a busy work schedule, we actually had the time to think about the permissions some apps require. While I understand every app needs some kind of permissions to do its job, I realized when taking the time to actually pay attention to these permissions that some are over the top and questionable.

In our case, we needed a simple flashlight for our dark night in the woods and it should only need access to the camera in order to turn the flash on. At first we were surprise to find out that some developers in the app store were asking for access to my contacts, ID & call information, photos/media/files, Wi-Fi information, amongst other things, all this for a flashlight?

At this point, I realized that if I was in the middle of a hectic day or stuck in rush hour, I would have hit the Accept button to all kinds of nonsensical app permissions thus potentially allowing malware to infect my device.

Nature has the capability to clear our lungs from pollution and our minds from vain distractions and thanks to that I learned that the best protection and security is grated first by everyone’s common sense and attention. So, be aware.

The State of the Art Scanning Engine that Bulldozes Mobile Malware

Android Security Suite

Studies have shown that at least 16 million mobile devices were infected with malware in 2014, and the numbers are only growing. Banking information, contacts and passwords are the main targets that hackers are willing to exploit without mobile users’ knowledge. The need for reliable antimalware software is imperative to protect mobile users data and block malware from getting onto the devices.

Viruses and other threats can get into your device via downloads, videos, webpages or apps. Few antimalware applications will detect them. When downloading an antimalware/antivirus for Android devices, make sure it breaks apart your apps, files and zip files to scan for possible threats. Also, look for the ones that have the capability of scanning for both Android and Windows viruses in order to prevent spreading infected files from your Android device to your home computer.

One app that does it all is Android Security Suite, its state of the art scanning engine will protect your passwords, identity, bank account info and other personal data on your Android devices. Protect your device today with reliable, free software you can trust.

Android Security Suite Presents…

Antivirus for Android

Real Time Protection

Comprehensive security that covers every move made on your device!

Real Time Protection means that your security is always being monitored. Thwart malicious activity the moment you become vulnerable. Our world-class technology was designed to stop problems before they start.

By monitoring your device with Real Time Protection, our app keeps you safe around the clock. Only one app delivers the comprehensive monitoring security needed to safeguard your Android devices 24/7.

With a three-pronged approach, our comprehensive security app keeps all of your valuable information safe from malicious activity.

1. App protection: Anytime you download, update, or modify an app on your Android device, your app is scanned for potential security breaches.

2. File protection: Android Security Suite is one of the only antivirus and anti-malware apps in the industry to scan files when they are created and modified. Real Time Protection goes a step further to break down Zip files to detect malware that exists within. Files on both your internal and SD card memory are covered by Real Time Protection.

3. Browsing protection: Android Security Suite protects you while you surf the web. Real Time Protection means that you are covered, even when you’re browsing. Malware can easily infect your Android device’s browser, but Real Time Protection easily detects websites that are embedded with viruses and malware.

Real Time Protection from Android Security Suite does it all. Download Android Security Suite today.

The Hidden Threats in Our Apps: Are Smartphones Safe from Viruses and Malware? Probably Not.

Android Security Suite

Since smartphones first burst onto the scene and starting gathering steam, very few owners have thought seriously about the viruses and malware that might be lurking in their phone’s operating system. Pre-smartphone, a phone was just a phone, incapable of being overtaken by malware and not really a serious target, since little to no data was stored on the device. Today’s smartphones are, however, more like computers than they are like the first generation of flip phones we all once had.

As users continue to rely more and more on their mobile devices (and less and less on laptops and computers), these smartphones are becoming bigger targets for hackers. It’s a common misconception that antivirus for Android operating systems does more harm than good. It’s true, these programs used to be clunky, battery-sucking nightmares. Today’s mobile antivirus is streamlined. But is it even necessary?

In the most recent Internet Security Report, put together by Symantec, it is reported that there are more than a million apps that are classified as malware available on the market right now. In 2014 alone, forty-six new families of malware just for Android were introduced. Without some kind of antivirus for Android, most users will be completely open to nasty malware.

As hackers are becoming more aggressive, users are becoming more flippant. All smartphone operating systems now have an app where you can store credit card, password, and personal information for easy use for online and in-app purchases. Shopping on mobile devices is becoming more and more popular, which means more and more users are entering their payment information into their mobile phones. This is all information that an aggressive malware app can scrape out of the phone and send back to its designers.

What is malware and why should we fear it? According to that same Symantec report, malware is any program designed to do harm. It covers viruses, Trojans, and worms—all of which can be blocked with the use of an antivirus app. Aside from these commonly known types of malware, there are more and more threats being introduced by malicious programs every year. One of the newest families includes Grayware, which are programs that do not contain viruses but are classified as annoying or harmful by the users. Dialers, adware, and joke programs all fall into this category.

Android Security Suite

Example of Madware in you device.

Another new category is Madware, which involves using aggressive programming to imbed advertising in the photos and calendars on your phone. These programs can also send push notifications to your phone and may even replace an existing ringtone with an advertisement. While not always damaging, both Grayware and Madware have the potential to be used by malicious programmers to scrape data from your phone and are, in and of themselves, annoying. If you’ve experienced either of these two new families of malware, you know that they can make your phone just as unusable as a piece of programming intentionally designed to harm your phone.

How do you identify these types of malware? Look for the following signs on your mobile device:

Send content – These programs will often utilize spam, premium SMS, and black hat SEO techniques to encourage you to send their content to your device.

Adware/Annoyance – Threats like these will use annoying popups and will send unwanted push notifications to your phone in an attempt to get you to click on their link, either for advertising or malicious purposes.

Reconfigure device – Many threats will automatically change your user settings in order to give themselves greater access to your data. Watch out for programs that ask for access to these types of settings.

More traditional threats – There are now downloaders, Trojans, Hack tools, and DDoS utilities made specifically to target you mobile device and the data it contains. These will often trigger a security alert.

Steal information – Any program that steals your data, from your media files to passwords to banking information is a malicious program that you do not want on your device

Track user – Many types of malware will track users’ locations.

Most mobile users walk a thin line. They want to keep their data safe, but they also want to have access to fun apps. Most people are more than willing to allow an app that they really want to have access to their personal information, especially if that app is free. That Symantec report found that most users think they know what they are agreeing to when they download an app, but that few really understand even the most basic app permission policies or how apps behave—more than 50% didn’t realize that apps can track their location in real time.

Android Security Suite

Android Security Suite, advanced anti-malware app for Android devices

It’s important to pay attention to your device, listen to what it is telling you, and to take action when you notice a pattern. It is more important now than ever to have the right antivirus for Android, to protect your device in real time and prevent apps, mobile websites, and files from harming you or your device.

Deceitful: hackers who exploit webcams to spy on you!

Mobile Cloud Labs

Photo by anieto2k. Flickr


Hackers sneak into your webcam more often than you think as a method to watch internet surfers without being noticed. To do this, you just need Internet access and a program that is silently installed on your computer.

Imagine being spied on by a hacker that has installed this software on your computer. Whenever you are connected to the Internet, the hacker can log in, see everything that happens on your screen and observe you through the camera. Of course, this intrusion occurs without you being aware of it.

Hackers can install Trojans or other viruses on your computer using your help unknowingly. Simple things like going to what appears to be a normal web page with nothing more than a harmless picture, can activate Trojans that will give access to files, passwords and every folder on your computer.

There are other programs that were originally created to repair and perform maintenance remotely by online support teams that can also be a problem. In the wrong hands, these programs have become espionage instruments that can be downloaded in special forums. This means that people don’t need to have great “hacker” skills, all they have to do is pay for these programs giving them the potential to use them against you.

Criminal organizations earn a lot of money by selling spyware programs. These organizations are very professional, well established and very successful. That’s why if you suspect you are being watched or that a hacker is manipulating your computer, follow these recommendations:

1. Immediately disconnect your computer from the Internet.
2. Clean your computer with an antivirus program.
3. Before opening any link, hover over to see if takes you to the desired page.
4. Do not open any files that you receive by strangers via email.
5. Place a sticky note, tape or Band-Aid on your camera to block all unwanted and prying eyes.

Always remain vigilant while on the Internet!

Spam: The Digital Plague

Spam, the digital plague
183 million spam messages are sent worldwide on a daily basis. Spamming can be a lucrative business that saturates email accounts and can transmit malware and viruses to your computer or mobile device.

It is estimated that worldwide, the damage caused by spam reaches in excess of $12 billion dollars. Anti spam activists such as the Spamhause Project or Google, fight against this plague.

Spammers usually operate with nonexistent companies to buy IP addresses and use outside servers. Unfortunately, 4 out of 5 spam messages advertise suspicious online businesses. For example, the so-called Nigerian scam is designed to make you think that you can get millions of dollars but only if you send a sum of money in advanced.

Other spam messages contain files that infect your computer or mobile device that allow hackers to control and access them remotely. Anti spam organizations maintain spam lists, which are used to block suspicious senders and report them to the police.

This digital plague is not something exclusive to Russia and Nigeria, as it is generally thought. In fact, industrialized countries such as Germany and Japan are in the top 10 lists, with the US in the first place.

 10 Worst Spam Countries

Image: The Spamhaus Project


In many countries, spam is difficult to control due to legislation and also because it is difficult to verify that a person did not give consent to receive such messages. Once the spammers are identified, anti spam activists report their information to the police in order to assist in putting a stop to it.

Despite the efforts of organizations such as Spamhaus or the police, the battle against spam is far from over. Spammers are constantly evolving and changing their methods until eventually this junk email will be more methodical, unrecognizable, and better integrated into the daily life.

The amount of spam is not expected to reduce, however anti-spam organizations have a clear objective: to prevent spam from reaching our inbox.

Spam is digital trash and as such it should be sent to the recycle bin unopened. Do not click on any links from spam emails and always protect your mobile devices against malware and other threats with antivirus solutions such as MyAntiTheft.

Why Google is wrong and why mobile antivirus is needed

Android malware

“Mobile anti-virus is not needed”, says Google’s head of Android security. Speaking to journalists at the company’s Mountain View headquarters in California, Adrian Ludwig states that there’s no reason to install something in addition to the security that Google provides.

Nevertheless, fragmentation among the different manufacturers remains one of Androids security problems that Google is trying to tackle in the new versions of Android. Google claims that Android antivirus apps are pointless and just scams.

With the upcoming release of the Mobile Cloud Labs new Android Security Suite we couldn’t disagree more. Not all Android antivirus applications are equal though. Through both internal testing conducted at Mobile Cloud Labs and independent tests, we have shown just the opposite of what Google states.

In fact, we agree that Android is most definitely a secure system as it is built on top of Linux with several design features that add layers of protection. Google is right from the standpoint that a true “antivirus” may not be needed.

Viruses by definition are self-replicating and typically inject themselves into files and other executable applications, which without a rooted Android phone is extremely difficult to do on an Android device.

However, Antivirus companies label their products as “antivirus” because that is what people have learned to look for coming out of the Windows era. What is definitely possible with Android that most good “antivirus” apps protect against, are classifications of malware such as “Spyware”, “Ransomware”, “Trojans”, and “Scareware”. These types of applications can steal your information, cause unexpected behavior and slow down your mobile device.

Android malware is typically built into simple unsuspecting apps such as flashlight apps, battery apps etc. If you download a flashlight app for your Android device and it requires any special privileges (presented to you before download), this is the first sign of bad intention by the distributor and possible malware.

The team behind Mobile Cloud Labs knows this because they have written proof of concept applications internally in order to know what to look for and what to protect against in our upcoming Android Security Suite.

Google is correct in the fact that mobile antivirus is not needed. Where they stand corrected is that the majority of mobile antivirus apps on the market are actually protecting against other forms of malware not necessarily viruses. These apps are marketed that way because face it, when was the last time you searched for “anti malware”?